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9 results, ordered by Publication Date

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Lieut. Richard Williams (surveyor) / Andrew Dury (publisher) / Jonathan Lodge (engraver), A PLAN OF BOSTON, and its ENVIRONS. shewing the true SITUATION of HIS MAJESTY’S ARMY. AND ALSO THOSE OF THE REBELS. Drawn by an Engineer at Boston. Octr. 1775.  London, 12th March, 1776.

Richard Williams’ fine plan of the siege of Boston

One of the finest contemporary plan of the 1775-76 siege of Boston, the opening campaign of the American Revolution, drawn by Richard Williams, a British officer on the spot, and published in London by Andrew Dury. The map is featured on the cover of Krieger and Cobb’s Mapping Boston, while Nebenzahl’s Atlas of the American […]

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Scarce and unusual plan of Revolutionary Boston

A scarce map of the Boston area issued during the earliest phase of the Revolution, published less than two months after the June 17, 1775 Battle of Bunker Hill and while the British were still besieged in Boston. The map is striking for its unusual circular format, which does not appear on any other contemporary map […]

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Scarce and unusual plan of Revolutionary Boston

A scarce map of the Boston area issued during the earliest phase of the Revolution. This image was published in the August 1775 Scots Magazine, just after the Battle of Bunker Hill and while the British were still besieged in the town. The map is striking on two counts. One is the circular layout, depicting the […]

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The most desirable 18th-century map of Boston

For its combination of importance, beauty and rarity, Pelham’s Plan of Boston is the most desirable printed map of the Revolution in New England and the most desirable map of Boston ever printed. In excellent condition and with provenance in the same family for two centuries, the example here offered can hardly be improved upon. Historical […]

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A very early map of the siege of Boston

One of the earliest obtainable maps relating to the Revolution, this map is based on an original drawn in June 1775, probably only days before the Battle of Bunker Hill. The depiction of Boston proper is striking-at the time, the city was essentially an island linked to the mainland via a narrow causeway. No street […]

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A very early map of the siege of Boston

One of the earliest obtainable maps relating to the Revolution, this map is based on an original drawn in June 1775, probably only days before the Battle of Bunker Hill. The depiction of Boston proper is striking-at the time, the city was essentially an island linked to the mainland via a narrow causeway. No street […]

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Scarce and unusual plan of Revolutionary Boston

A scarce map of the Boston area issued during the earliest phase of the Revolution. This image was published in the Scots Magazine, less than two months after the June 17, 1775 Battle of Bunker Hill and while the British were still besieged in Boston. The map is striking for its unusual circular format, which does […]

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A fine and important plan of occupied Boston

One of the best Revolutionary-era depictions of Boston under siege, taken from surveys made on the spot by British forces occupying the town. This plan is attributed to Lieutenant Thomas Hyde Page (1746-1821), a British military engineer who served briefly in Boston before being severely wounded at Bunker Hill and invalided back to England. Based on […]

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Lieut. [Thomas] Page and Capt. [John] Montresor (map makers) / William Faden (publisher), BOSTON its ENVIRONS and HARBOUR, with the REBELS WORKS RAISED AGAINST THAT TOWN IN 1775, from the Observations of LIEUT. PAGE of His MAJESTY'S Corps of Engineers, and from the Plans of Capt. Montresor. , London, October 1, 1777.

The siege of Boston, by British engineers who were on the spot

One of the most careful depictions of the Boston area executed during the Revolution, taken from surveys made on the spot by British engineers. Following the April 19, 1775 battles at Lexington and Concord, the British retreated to Boston. There they were besieged by thousands of New England militia who encamped in Charlestown, Cambridge, Brookline […]

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