11 results, ordered by Publication Date

Available for purchase

Major A. LaCarriere Latour Late principal Engineer 7th Military District U.S. Army, A GENERAL MAP of the seat of War in Louisiana & West Florida shewing all the fortified Points and encampments of both the American and British Armies also the march of Genl. Jackson’s army on his expedition against Pensacola. Philadelphia, 1816.

1816 map of the Seat of War in Louisiana & West Florida

A fine map of the southern theatre of the War of 1812, encompassing the area from Pensacola to western Louisiana, drawn by an American participant. The Gulf Region saw a great deal of fighting during the War of 1812, involving not only American and British armies, but the Spanish (who still nominally controlled West Florida), […]

View Details

No longer available

Rare map of the Chickasaw cession

A very rare map produced following the 1832 “Treaty of Pontotoc,” which committed the Chickasaw to migrate west of the Mississippi and be compensated with the proceeds from the sale of their ceded territory. The map exists in only a few known institutional examples, and there is no record of any having appeared on the […]

View Details

The first “Coffin Handbill”

A great rarity of presidential politics, published during the virulent campaign of 1828. One of only three examples located. Background With the demise of the Federalist Party after the War of 1812, the Republican Party almost inevitably began to fracture into “National” and “Radical” or “Old Republican” factions. The former advocated a more robust Federal […]

View Details

The Battle of New Orleans

A fine map of the New Orleans campaign of 1814-1815, which culminated in the Battle of New Orleans, marked the last major fighting of the War of 1812, and established Andrew Jackson as a national hero. Background The final British offensive of the War of 1812 took place in the Gulf of Mexico, where in late […]

View Details

A virulent anti Andrew Jackson broadside

With the demise of the Federalists after the War of 1812, the Republican Party began to fracture. “National Republicans” advocated a more robust Federal government and attracted old Federalists such as John Quincy Adams. “Old” or “Radical Republicans” found their support in the South and the West and represented the Jeffersonian tradition of weak central government, […]

View Details

A rare variant “Coffin Handbill,” not described in Cook

A vivid anti-Jackson propaganda broadside, published during the virulent presidential campaign of 1828. Background With the demise of the Federalist Party after the War of 1812, the Republicans almost inevitably began to fracture into “National” and “Radical” or “Old Republican” factions. The former advocated a more robust Federal government and attracted old Federalists such as John […]

View Details

Targeting Andrew Jackson with the first “Coffin Handbill”

A great rarity of Presidential politics, published during the virulent campaign of 1828. Background With the demise of the Federalist Party after the War of 1812, the Republican Party began to fracture into “National” and “Radical” or “Old Republican” factions. The former advocated a more robust Federal government and attracted old Federalists such as John […]

View Details

Andrew Jackson and the founding of Memphis

A remarkable plat detailing divisions of a large tract along the Mississippi River, owned by Andrew Jackson and his close associates and forming the heart of modern-day Memphis, Tennessee. The text below the survey identifies the tract as “Grant No. 283 for 5000 acres granted by North Carolina to John Rice.” Located on the east bank […]

View Details