Map of Texas and Loyal Colonies

MAP OF TEXAS AND LOYAL COLONIES SOMETIMES REFERRED TO AS THE UNITED STATES. San Antonio: Nowotny-Burrel Co., 1956.
Map printed in colors on rayon with green rayon selvage, 28 ½” square at edges. Folds, easily flattened, else excellent.
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A comic 1956 pictorial map printed on rayon and depicting Texas and its “Loyal Colonies”. In this alternative universe the other 47 states of the continental U.S. are shunted aside, compressed, and given absurd punning names, while a hypertrophied Texas sprawls from the Canadian to the Mexican borders. The Texas interior is crammed with pictorial vignettes and text, generally tending toward the superlative, for example “largest wheat field on earth”, “all the helium in the world”, “most beautiful ladies on earth”, “greatest pine forest on earth”, “biggest oil field in the world” and, at the Alamo, “most heroic battle in world history”.

The other states are given bastardized names such as “Calaphoney,” “New Jerk,” “Missed Again” and my favorite, “Oklahomely”. Meanwhile, in the Pacific lie “footballs thrown by Texas who overshot their receivers sit in the Pacific Ocean,” and whales “used to stock Texas fish ponds”. The map is surmounted by a Texas longhorn, flanked by the state flag (“Old Gory”), state bird, branding irons, and a compass rose with a fifth direction pointing to Texas.

Vast, populous, and one of the few states (along with Hawaii and Vermont) to have been an independent nation at one time, Texas is renowned for its strong self image. Map of Texas and Loyal Colonies is thus just one example of a long tradition of outlandish pictorial maps celebrating all things Texan, such as The Official Texas Brags Map of North America (1948) and Map of the United States Completely Surrounded by Texas (1949).

Nowotny-Burrel Co. was founded in the 1950s and run by cousins Monroe Nowotny and Joe Burrel in San Antonio, TX. A 1960 San Antonio Express and News article describes the company as a flag wholesaler. A 1951 advertisement in Billboard magazine advertises various toys, party goods, and decorations, while a 1951 trademark patent mentions the production of moccasins and cowboy suits. That same year Nowotny-Burrel issued a smaller version of Texas and Loyal Colonies, printed on paper and uncolored.

References
Not in OCLC.